Monthly Archives: November 2013

Ducks!

Some of the 257 (and counting) rubber duckies surrounding one coworker’s cubicle. Each one is unique:

One of 257 rubber duckies surrounding one coworker's cubicle.

One of 257 rubber duckies surrounding one coworker’s cubicle. Each one is unique.

There is nothing more to be said, other than to note that the person in question is a computer techie.

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Adventures in retail display

To the left, a nifty dark green evening frock with shimmering highlights. In the center, a daring see-through lace party dress, with a discreet, mostly opaque shell underneath. To the right —

Pinhead mannequin with no arms and a dress hanging from the pinhead.

You want the mannequin dressed? Do it yourself! And I’m ripping off the arms, too!

Forget it. They don’t pay me enough for this stuff. I’m quitting.

Alien artifact

Google has been successful selling Android phones in spite of their rather frightening commercials that suggests an Android phone will turn you into a cyborg. Since Android phones are ridiculously easy to compromise with malware, turning them into pieces of a robot army controlled by sinister forces (no, I’m not making that up), maybe the ads should be considered truth in advertising?

Even so, humans tend to be somewhat leery of robots, androids, and aliens from outer space. Yet this alien artifact was recently spot in a food court of a shopping mall:

Alien artifact found in the food court of a shopping mall.

Alien artifact found in the food court of a shopping mall.

After cautiously approaching the blue glowing monolith, it appeared to be disguised as a charging station for mobile phones. But there were no mobile phones anywhere near it, just snaking cables reaching greedily for passersby.

Medical advice

Profound advice from a bumper sticker on profound advice:

Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for you.

Ask your doctor if medical advice from a television commercial is right for you.

Fun fact: the United States and New Zealand are the only countries that allow direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising.